Our Winter Pulse Check results showed that while many business owners remain confident their businesses are doing well, there has been a marked rise in those reporting anxiety, stress, and disturbed sleep as operating conditions worsen.

And it’s not just business owners feeling stressed.  The impact of Covid on workplace stress levels has been significant over the past 12 months and media coverage has highlighted the potential financial liability business owners may have if they choose to ignore the signs among employees.

The first step to reducing workplace stress is being able to identify and acknowledge it exists. There are several tools available to do this and it is an area we’ve been exploring for some time, in association with TTI Success Insights and an online tool – called Stress Quotient®  – which helps Kiwi business owners identify, measure and monitor various stress types within organisations and teams. Defining stress as ‘the harmful physical and emotional responses that occur when the requirements of the job do not match the capabilities, resources, or needs of the worker’, Stress Quotient®  identifies seven key workplace stressors that both employers and employees need to watch for.

  1. DEMAND: While today’s employees may want challenging tasks to maintain their engagement and motivation, it is important that demands do not exceed the ability to cope. Workplace stress tends to build as demands and responsibilities increase. Stress can be directly tied to poorly designed jobs, excessive workloads and talents and skills not matching the work. The goal is to have a balance between demands and time.
  2. EFFORT/REWARD BALANCE:  Having purpose or job satisfaction is an important factor in any job. High effort without satisfying one’s need for rewards can lead to workplace stress. Rewards come in many forms; recognition, helping others, gaining knowledge, personal growth, structure or compensation. High effort in the workplace is essential but must be matched by the reward that the individual desires. Workplace stress arises when there is a significant disconnect between needs and rewards.
  3. CONTROL: A feeling of powerlessness is a universal cause of job stress. You alter or avoid the situation because you feel nothing can be done. Common sources of stress at work include complaints of too much responsibility with too little authority, being involved, not being heard and no one understanding what you really do. Workplace stress increases as one’s degree of control decreases. The goal is to have a balance between responsibilities and personal control.
  4. ORGANISATIONAL CHANGE: Organisational change affects people differently. While some people welcome it, others become apprehensive and stressed at the mere mention of change. Organisational change can be defined as any change in people, structure, technology or procedures and can vary in degree and direction, produce uncertainty and initiate both stress and opportunities.
  5. MANAGER/SUPERVISOR INFLUENCE:  Common reasons given for stress at work include lack of effort from your employees or self-imposed pressure on yourself. Most people don’t realise that stress is a part of every job. That’s why, when you are working under reasonable demands you can get the job done more efficiently. However, when you do things that go beyond normal pressure this can cause stress.
  6. SOCIAL SUPPORT: A lack of support from colleagues and leadership can lead to workplace stress. A supportive environment is one where leadership provides clear and consistent information and co-workers stand ready to assist when needed. An environment that promotes positive working relationships and addresses unacceptable behaviour promotes productivity and employee engagement.
  7. JOB SECURITY: People worry about many aspects of their jobs, but most of the fear comes from job security. Job insecurity comes from the fear of job loss and the associated unemployment implications. Stress can also originate from a lack of advancement or being promoted too slowly. People also can have a concern with being promoted too quickly to be successful in the job.

By measuring each of these seven key workplace stressors, we can focus on the things that are within one’s control without having to make huge changes or rethinking career ambitions.

There’s a well-known saying: What gets measured gets managed so it may be time for NZ businesses to start measuring organisational and individual stress levels. Not doing so may overlook important health and safety issues in the workplace.

If you think Stress Quotient® could be a valuable tool to identify, measure and monitor stress levels in your organisation please get in touch with me or one of The Alternative Board team.

Business InsightsWhat’s your Stress Quotient® – and how can you keep it under control?