As we bubble along in this ongoing stew of uncertainty, business owners are finding operational challenges are heating up on several fronts, not least of which is the skills shortage.

Exacerbated by current immigration policies, there is no doubt whatsoever that it is harder and harder to retain staff. One company I know has lost seven staff in recent weeks – two changed professions entirely, three have gone to competing firms and two have gone overseas to be reunited with their loved ones. The company had done all it could to keep the staff but external pressures put paid to their efforts putting them back in the recruitment market looking at a rapidly evaporating pool of talent.

There are macro-economic needs that have to be addressed at government level in order to resolve this and other pressures but what can business owners do in the meantime?

At the time of writing, New Zealand is at the start of Mental Health Awareness Week and the internet and social channels are abuzz with ways to help others – and yourself – manage your mental health. For employers, employee wellbeing has moved to centre stage. As we all deal with the challenges of prolonged lockdowns and restrictions, for some households significantly reduced incomes, home schooling, distance-caring and a host of other concerns, our employees’ wellbeing is paramount. We have to consider how workload can be managed, communication maintained and skills improved in a radically altered operating environment. Money is no longer the only motivator – employees are looking for genuine consideration and a purpose-driven employer – which means wellbeing policies have to be developed and implemented. And not only policies develop – in recent years the management of wellbeing has become a job in itself, with larger companies introducing the role of ‘chief wellbeing officer’ or ‘employee wellbeing director’.

The other great motivator is personal development – which is the cue for all business owners to get training today. Find the right people to sit in the right seats undertaking work they are suited for – trying to ‘fill the job’ with the wrong person will only make things worse. Training and development from within will help you grow your people along with your vision. If you are not sure about the qualities and strengths needed for a role, run a skills audit and identify what’s needed and, if you still find yourself struggling, ask for help – this is one of the many areas where a peer board or business mentoring can be invaluable.

The skills shortage will be with us for some time – building a reputation as an employer of choice with genuine concern for employees is one way to tackle the challenge.

Business InsightsIs Employee Wellbeing the Key to Skills Shortages?