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How do we treat our employees?

How do we treat our employees?

Have you ever considered that the way we treat our employees has similarities to how we bring up our children?

If we don’t guide our children, establish boundaries, praise when appropriate and clearly communicate consequences, then we are probably doing them a disservice. 

A child turns into a teenager and if that teenager goes off the rails and becomes a recidivist youth offender as a result of a dysfunctional family and a lack of strong core values, who is responsible for this teenager’s anti-social and criminal behaviour?  The answer is probably both the teenager and the family. But think about the influence the parents could have had on this outcome if the teenager had been brought up in a different environment, one of

  • love,
  • empathy,
  • strong values,
  • accountability, and
  • discipline.  

If this were the case, I am sure we would be talking about a different teenager!

In this example it is easy to lay the blame of this anti-social behaviour with the teenager; some people will even say ‘lock him up and throw away the key’, as if the problem will just go away.  But we do need to ask ourselves; “Where does the real problem lie?”.

A similar philosophy applies in business.  We diligently recruit staff to give us the best chance of finding the right person, with the required skillset and strong core values to ensure they have the right attitude and attributes to fit with our organisation.   This is the first step, but once employed, similar to bringing up children, we need to provide them an environment where they can develop and flourish. 

A poor performing employee may be managed out a business or even fired, but does that performance issue rest with the employee or the employer?  The answer again is probably both, but if this employee was working for an employer that had a;

  • clear vision for the business,
  • strong values,
  • effective communication,
  • an engaged and positive culture,
  • clear goals and expectations for all staff,
  • consistency, empathy and inspirational leadership

I am sure we could well be talking about a different outcome for this employee.

Often our first instinct is to blame, in this case ‘let’s fire the troublesome employee’, but shouldn’t we first look inwards to see if we have contributed to this outcome and ask ourselves whether we have done everything we possibly can to give this employee the best chance of succeeding? 

If we can answer ‘yes’ to this question then we can move forward with conviction and certainty. Staff will still need to be praised, disciplined and some poor performers may still lose their jobs, but we can act with confidence in the knowledge that we have done everything we can to positively influence the outcome.   

Chris Deere is the owner of The Alternative Board Auckland South.  You can contact Chris on 027 582 2553, [email protected]board.co.nz or connect with him on LinkedIn.

We’ve Done It Before – We Can Do It Again

We’ve Done It Before – We Can Do It Again

A sudden slip into Alert Level Three, the blast of the emergency ‘COVID’ warning through our phones and once again we’re into the balancing act of keeping our businesses moving in exceptional circumstances.

Last month our Pulse Check results told us how adaptable and flexible New Zealand’s small business are, with business owners altering operations and changing practice in order to survive the challenges that 2020 has thrown at us all. Just as we have rolled out our August Pulse Check – which you can access here if you would like to participate – the beat has changed again and, in Auckland, we are facing at least three days at Level 3, probably more, with the rest of New Zealand parked up at Level 2 for the time being.

We asked our Auckland team for their thoughts on the current situation and their advice was simple — we’ve been here before, rely on past experience and know that it will pass.

The Alternative Board’s managing director Stephen James said: “Knowing it will pass, spend some time addressing a few scenarios. For example, if Level 3 lasts, as announced, for three days what do you need to do? Or, if it remains in place for two weeks or if Level 4 is declared and we have full lockdown for an indefinite period — what then? Develop plans of action for each scenario and communicate these to your staff and stakeholders.”

Scenarios are very helpful when it comes to managing uncertainty as Alfredo Puche explained in his recent blog post. Other helpful advice is to be found in Gordon Stuart’s tips on surviving a recession and Karen Van Eden’s thought-provoking piece on thriving in times of uncertainty.

Whatever your approach, remember that The Alternative Board is here to help you, the business owner, manage and grow your business regardless of circumstances — and we are all here, ready to help you.

As Karen says: “We’ve done this before – together we can do it again. Stay safe, stay well.”

The Alternative Board - Owners Auckland South