It’s a rocky road for employers these days – one day it’s a COVID19 alert level change and the next we’re dealing with an earthquake. Much support has been given to employers to help them through these times but have employees been properly supported by all the processes and systems we’ve seen launched since COVID19 first made its presence felt?

A couple of weeks ago the national alerts sounded following the earthquakes – particularly the big one in the Kermadecs – and many employees were sent home. The question is, were they sent home with or without pay? What were their expectations of their employer in that particular emergency? Did they expect to be paid for the day even though it was unlikely they would return to work until the emergency had passed? It’s hard for businesses to bear that cost in the current COVID climate yet, if employees don’t know what to expect from their companies when emergencies occur, how will that affect their relationship with the business? As we know, one of the many COVID fall-outs is the lack of skilled staff – so will poor communication or unclear policies lead to staff losses?

All these questions take us back to the topics of contingency planning and internal communication. In between emergencies – which seem to come thick and fast – it is worth taking some time to work out how your business is going to manage employee expectations. As businesses grow, it can be hard to maintain good internal communications but it should always be a priority. Strong businesses are strong from the inside out. Internal communication that helps employees understand emergency processes – from where to head when an alarm goes off to expectations around pay, sick leave and holidays – is essential for a business to thrive.

All businesses – large or small – should communicate constantly with their staff. That way when the unexpected does happen, what comes next is no surprise. Physically, when the tsunami warning sounds, we all want to be high and dry but nobody wants to be left high and dry financially. Forward planning, understanding your cash flow – getting inside the numbers – building reserves where you can, all help you, as a business owner, survive the storms and make sure your employees are sheltered when the going gets rough.

New Zealand’s small businesses are known for their ‘family feel’ and the majority of business owners create a work whanau where trust and respect flourish. This is often the result of good internal communication backed by great business planning on the part of the owner. If you are a young business, a growing business or even a larger business that may have lost touch with its employees and their expectations, the advice would be take a moment and sort out your policies today then let people know what to expect and when. Being prepared for the next emergency and knowing how you are going to manage the situation is all part of our new reality where the unexpected is the norm.

Business InsightsTake cover – and communicate